TRAINING:

Responsive Workshops

Provide training to state and local health departments, and territorial and municipal institutions, in vector surveillance, laboratory and field procedures, vector management strategies, and prevention and communications activities.

As part of our three-tiered training program, the SECVBD aims to be responsive to the needs of our stakeholders; in alignment with our goal of building the communities of practice in public health entomology, we have provided fellowships for individuals throughout the region to attend trainings that are held by local partners and focused on local topics/training of interest in vector borne diseases. Examples of responsive workshops can be found below.

Interested in hosting or have an idea for future trainings? Contact us

Insecticide Resistance Training Workshop

On February 12th, 2019, East Carolina University hosted a workshop to provide training on insecticide resistance testing to mosquito control personnel.

Tennessee Mosquito University 3.0

Tennessee Department of Health hosted Tennessee Mosquito University 3.0 a workshop which focused on teaching attendees about pesticide resistance in mosquitoes. It was held May 1 – 2, 2019 at the Tennessee Public Health Laboratory in Nashville, TN. The goal of this training was to provide public health and vector control professionals opportunities to get training in line with best practices: training focused on mosquitoes and insecticide resistance, with topics including types of resistance, how to perform a bottle bioassay, mosquito egg collection, and larval identification, among others. Learning was reinforced through hands-on activities.

Midwest Four Corners Tick Workshop

Arkansas Department of Health hosted the Midwest Four Corners Tick Workshop on June 17th – June 21st, 2019. The workshop covered topics including tick identification, control, prevention, field collection, and tick-borne diseases.

The Southeastern Regional Center of Excellence in Vector Borne Diseases is supported through a cooperative agreement between the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the University of Florida.
© 2020 All Rights Reserved